ibp Journalism Awards 2016: Judges

Giles Barrie, Managing Director, FTI Consulting [former editor, Property Week]

Adrian Barrick, Global Brand Director, Haymarket Business Media [former editor, Buildin] *

Lewis Blackwell, Executive Director, The Building Centre [former journalist: Estates Times]

Pip Clothier, Journalist and broadcaster

Mark Collins, Executive Director, CBRE

Michael Day, Managing Director, Integra Property Services

Peter Day, Correspondent, BBC 'In Business' programme

Tim Denton, Director, Denton Media, Consultant to Dennis Publishing *

George Demetri, Freelance Journalist [former editor World Tunnelling & Port Technology Int]

Hannah Fearn, Comment Editor, The Independent *

Soraya Khan, Founder Partner, Theis and Khan Architects

David Lawson, Freelance Journalist

Mike Leonard, Director, Modern Masonry Alliance *

Lee Mallett, Consultant, Urbik Limited [former editor, Building Design/Estates Times]

Dominic Morgan, Director, Ing Media [former deputy editor, Property Week]

Richard Northedge, City & Business Journalist [former deputy City editor, The Sunday Telegraph]

Alasdair Reisner, CEO, Civil Engineering Contractors Association [former journalist: Construction News]

Peter Roper, Freelance Journalist

Dickon Ross, Editor-in-Chief, Engineering & Technology

Barbara Rowlands, Associate Professor of Journalism, City University London *

David Saffin, Consulting Engineer, CEO, Second Option Alliance

John Slaughter, Director, External Affairs, Home Builders Federation

Ruth Slavid, Architectural editor and journalist, [former editor AJ Online]

David Taylor, Editor, New London Quarterly

John Waples, UK Head of Strategic Communications, FTI Consulting [former City editor, the Sunday Times]

James Whitmore, Tavistock [former Executive Editor, Property Week]

John Yadoo, Partner, Pryme Consulting [Vice President CIOB]

*New judges for 2016
This list of judges is correct at the time of issue
30 June 2016

 

Download a PDF of this list

Communication and PR Awards Nominations

The following, listed alphabetically, have been nominated in the 2016 Communication and PR Awards.

Best Business Communications Campaign
Colliers International
Goodfellow Communications

Integrated Campaign
Holistic
London Communications Agency
The Oracle Group

In House Communications Team
Arcadis Global PR
Colliers International
Galliford Try

Young Communicator of the Year
Amelie Barrau, Press Officer
WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff
Tim Daborn, Account Manager
Goodfellow Communications
Geoff Robjent, Account Director. Property PR
Four Communications

PR Consultancy Team
Holistic Group
London Communications Agency
YOU Agency

The winners will be announced and presented with their award at the Awards Party on Thursday 16 June, at St Martin’s Hall and Light Well, St Martin-in-the Field, Trafalgar Square.

IBP Events Programme 2016

IBP runs a pro-active and re-active programme of events; therefore, the programme listed below only includes planned events. A number of other events are promoted as and when a subject or industry issues needs to be aired.

 

THURSDAY 28 April

TALKING DIGITAL WITH THE GUARDIAN and the WALL STREET JOURNAL

IBP Futures Group

Chaired by: Nick Duxbury, Executive Editor, Inside Housing

Hosted by: Edelman

Time/Venue: 6.30pm: Southside, 103 Victoria Street, SW1E 6QT

Speakers:

Martin Belam, Social and New Formats Editor, The Guardian

Sarah Marshall, Social Media Editor, The Wall Street Journal

 

THURSDAY 16 JUNE

COMMUNICATION and PR AWARDS

IBP Summer Party

Venue: St Martin’s Hall and Light Well, St Martin in the Fields, Trafalgar Square

Hosted by: Rebecca Evans, Editor, Construction News, President IBP

Speaker: Sophie Walker, Leader of the UK’s Women’s Equity Party

Programme in development

 

JULY

IBP Virtual AGM

 

AUGUST

Call for Entries: IBP Annual Journalism Awards

Awards entries close Friday 9 September

Awards Judging: Monday 10 October

 

LATE SEPTEMBER

IBP Futures Group

Subject:

Hosted by:

Time/Venue:

In development

 

THURSDAY 01 DECEMBER

IBP Annual National Journalism Awards Dinner

Venue: Four Seasons Hotel, Park Lane

Guest Speaker & Awards Presented by:

Peter Wynne Rees CBE, Professor of Places and City Planning

UCL Faculty of the Built Environment

Awards Presentations hosted by:

Peter Murray, Chairman, New London Architecture Gallery at The Building Centre

Programme in development

 

MONDAY12 DECEMBER

Communications Industry Carol Service

Venue: St Bride’s Church, Fleet Street, London EC4 6.30 to 7.30pm
Reception: All Bar One, Ludgate Hill – 7.30PM onwards

 

What a Journo Should Know

President of the IBP and Editor of Construction News, Rebecca Evans outlines what she thinks all journalists starting out in the industry should be aware of.

When I entered journalism, it was clear that things were changing. Being open to the changes taking place would be my first piece of advice for journalists starting out in the current climate.

A shifting journalistic world

Back in 2000 when I started out, publications operated in a fundamentally different way. This was a world before iPhones and tablets, when traditional print was still the main way people digested content.

But over the past 10 years, the number of people using the internet increased five fold. By mid 2014 almost 90% of the UK were online and now in 2015 61% of people use their mobile phones to access the internet.

world-online

The world has moved online.

These developments have had serious implications for the way journalists work. We’ve all had to challenge ourselves as to how we transform the traditional magazine model into something that is a genuine digital proposition.

That doesn’t mean traditional print has become redundant but it does mean content must be tailored to cater for different needs, including via different platforms. You have to make sure you are making your customers happy, whether they are reading your hard copy magazine or reading you on their phone or their laptop. The truth is we are able to offer far more online – there’s more content, it’s faster and it’s more personalised.

Data doesn’t lie

The digital age means it’s possible for us to use data to inform our editorial decisions.
In the past you wanted to get the ‘best’ story, but weren’t challenged in the same way as to what exactly the ‘best’ story meant. Now there are huge amounts of analytics that can be collected and shared, so everybody on the team can see exactly how many people are looking at and engaging with their stories.

Has this increased competition? There’s always been and always will be competition, and that’s part of what drives good media. In the same way that journalists traditionally competed for the front page, now they are also competing for the most-read story of the week online or having the best Twitter reach.

Your gut instinct of what makes a good story is still important but you also need to know that people are looking at it. Whatever the business model of your title – subscription, metered, free – you need to be getting the right people looking at your content in the right numbers.

The importance of context

My career has been spent in B2B journalism and I have found that specialised knowledge is less of a prerequisite and more of an end goal. Construction News is the fifth B2B title I’ve worked on, and not all of those titles have been in the built environment. I moved around from sector to sector, covering social housing, local government and NHS policy before joining Construction News. .

I don’t expect journalists to join my team with knowledge of construction already. I expect them to join with an interest in current affairs, with an interest in the economy, politics and business. They don’t need to be a specialist in construction, they need to be a brilliant journalist – they’ll learn the sector knowledge on the job.

It’s not a problem to change subject areas, as long as you’re prepared to put yourself out there, to ask questions and to admit when there’s something you don’t know.

The advantage to working in different industries and sectors is that it helps you to understand the bigger picture and that makes you a better journalist. The more you can get to grips with the context surrounding your stories, the more you can make them relevant to your audience. Crucially, an understanding of context allows you to consider better the way your writing might make your readers feel. Tapping into people’s intrinsic motivations is a powerful way of gaining, and more importantly, retaining attention.

Understand social media (and its limitations)

Social media is a brilliant journalistic tool. Every journalist should have a Twitter feed. This doesn’t mean having a huge amount of followers necessarily, but using it to interact and engage with others.

Twitter is not just about broadcasting your own voice but listening to others, it’s all about two-way engagement. Being able to demonstrate that you are very good at engaging with people on Twitter, that you understand how to build a following and what makes people tick is certainly an advantage when it comes to getting a job.

Having said that, when it comes to doing the job, nothing beats the importance of building ‘real-life’ relationships. It’s great to have instant conversations with people you’ve never met via Twitter, but journalists still need to know when to pick up the phone and when to get out and see someone in person.

Never stop networking

The importance of networking for journalists has in no way diminished. We may be used to communicating in a very digital way, but nothing beats having an actual face-to-face conversation and that is no less true now than it was 15 years ago.

Networking is key to building, maintaining and expanding the relationships you have with people. For journalists, this means regularly attending events where you are confident that at a good proportion of the guests are going to be useful to talk to.

Think about the events that the IBP runs: the annual journalism awards are really important because you meet other journalists – competitors and peers – as well as PRs and other important people in the built environment.

If you’re able to hear directly from leading journalists about how they have progressed their career and talk to them in person, it builds connections. You can’t beat meeting people: no matter how many online followers you have, you’ve still got to be at the right events, talking to the right people.

What does a successful networker look like? I’d expect them to have several meetings a week and attend an evening or breakfast event at least a couple of times a week.

Rebbeca Evans at The Journalism Awards
Rebecca Evans at The Construction News Awards

Adapting is surviving

Being open to change and being able to demonstrate that I have led a process of change, has helped me further my career. Journalism is evolving, and particularly with all the digital opportunities and challenges, change is an inevitable part of the business.

How can you demonstrate your adaptability? It is all about identifying chances to stand out. It’s about innovating, particularly with digital opportunities, and using your initiative to do something different or new, such as presenting a set of data in a way that no one’s done before.

Ask yourself – What do people really want from us here? What’s really valuable? Then demonstrate that you’ve used your initiative to address the answers.

Sometimes we all have to do things that might fail. There must be a willingness to think about things, try things, test them, and if they don’t work, tweak them or move on.

Change is not a threat

Journalists should expect and embrace change. We probably don’t even know what some of our job titles will be in five years’ time; be open to opportunities as they arise.

I think it’s important not to see change as a threat. Journalism will survive. When I started working, I didn’t think “I want to get into digital” but it’s been incredibly interesting and rewarding. It’s a very exciting time to be a journalist.

IBP President’s AGM Report 2015

I hope all IBP members will join me in feeling proud that over the past 12 months we have retained and enhanced the most valued elements of the IBP’s offer to its members while innovating and evolving as all good organisations must.

The atmosphere at the annual journalism awards at the Four Seasons Hotel in October was competitive and yet warm – a testament to how highly valued these awards are and at the same time how membership of the IBP bestows a real sense of being part of the built environment journalism community. National Housing Federation chief executive David Orr’s keynote speech illustrated just how much housing and the built environment would be hotly debated topics in the run up to the general election and beyond.

Housing was a central topic too at the annual Strategic Land Debate in November. The theme, ‘Whose Land Is It Anyway’ brought forth spirited discussion from the distinguished panellists on the green belt, garden cities, the private rented sector and High Speed 2.

Claer Barrett of the Financial Times chaired her final Futures Group event in May – a thought-provoking panel discussion of the ways digital media have changed and will continue to change the way we all work and the content we produce. On behalf of the board, I’d like to thank Claer for so successfully chairing the IBP Futures Group since its inception. She is succeeded by Nick Duxbury, executive editor, Inside Housing, who brings fresh ideas for a programme of events beginning in September.
I am delighted that we launched the new IBP website this year – it has more video, is more interactive and makes it even easier to get involved.

The PR and Communication Awards in July moved up in the world – this year taking place at the Sky Bar overlooking the rooftops of St Paul’s, a stunning backdrop to the winners’ celebrations.

This year the IBP Journalism Awards will join the PR Awards in offering an online entry process which we hope will attract even more submissions. The entries will be carefully sorted by a number of new judges from across journalism and the built environment who join the prestigious judging panel.

The IBP’s social media presence continues to grow, with a LinkedIn group and an ever growing band of Twitter followers. Twitter is one great way to get in touch to suggest other things we should be doing for our members and to attract new recruits. And, on that note, if you have a colleague who isn’t yet a member, do encourage them to join us. There’s plenty more to come this year!

Rebecca Evans
Editor, Construction News
President, IBP
@CNRebeccaEvans
@mediaIBP

Judges Announced for the ibp Journalism Awards 2015

 ibplogo

savills

Bernard Aryeeley, Head of Policy, Research and Public Affairs, Shelter
Giles Barrie, Managing Director, FTI Consulting [former editor, Property Week]
Lewis Blackwell, Executive Director, The Building Centre [former journalist: Estates Times]
Pip Clothier, Journalist and broadcaster
Mark Collins, Executive Director, CBRE
Michael Day, Managing Director, Integra Property Services
Peter Day, Correspondent, BBC 'In Business' programme
Jenny Davey, Partner, Finsbury, [former City editor, the Sunday Times]
George Demetri, Freelance Journalist [former editor World Tunnelling]
Alison Gow, Editor, Digital Innovation, Trinity Mirror (Regionals)
Soraya Khan, Founder Partner, Theis and Khan Architects
David Lawson, Freelance Journalist
Lee Mallett, Consultant, Urbik Limited [former editor, Building Design/Estates Times]
Dominic Morgan, Director, Ing Media [former deputy editor, Property Week]
Richard Northedge, City & Business Journalist [former deputy City editor, The Sunday Telegraph]
Kate Pain, Head of Digital Media, IHS
Stuart Piercy, Founder, Stuart Piercy Company architects
Alasdair Reisner, Chief Executive, Civil Engineering Contractors Association [former journalist: Construction News]
Peter Roper, Freelance Journalist
Dickon Ross, Editor-in-Chief, Engineering & Technology
David Saffin, Consulting Engineer
Andrew Sawers, Freelance Journalist [former editor, Accountancy Age]
John Slaughter, Director, External Affairs, Home Builders Federation
Ruth Slavid, Architectural editor and journalist, [former editor AJ Online]
Martin Spring, Freelance Journalist [former architecture editor, Building]
David Taylor, Editor, New London Quarterly
John Waples, UK Head of Strategic Communications, FTI Consulting [former City editor, the Sunday Times]
James Whitmore, Tavistock [former Executive Editor, Property Week]
Pip Wood, Corporate Communications Director, British Land
John Yadoo, Partner, Pryme Consulting [Vice President CIOB]

This list of judges is correct at the time of going to print.

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Savills Headline IBP Journalism Awards

Photo: 2014 triple award winner, Nick Duxbury, Inside Housing, with David Orr, Chief Executive, National Housing Federation and the coveted Journalist of the Year award.

Savills has taken on the headline sponsorship for this year’s IBP Journalism Awards, after five years as sponsor of the Commercial Property Writer category.

Victoria Buchanan, Savills Director and Head of Commercial Press said: “Our commitment to the awards and decision to expand the categories that we sponsor reflects the breath and depth of our business. It is also important to us to support the journalists who work hard to provide our industry with the best news and analysis in the business sector”.

Gerald Bowey, Chief Executive of ibp Services commented: “I am delighted that Savills have reviewed their support of the awards and committed to the headline sponsorship, which includes hosting the Business/Financial Journalist category as well as the coveted IBP Journalist of the Year Award. This sits well with our other sponsors, listed below”

Savills will also host the pre Awards Dinner reception, at the Four Seasons hotel, due to take place on Thursday 19th November.

There are still a couple of categories available for sponsorship, so if you want to host a table in the company of leading editors and journalists and put your brand on a category please contact me on 0771 348 9390 or email: gerald@geraldbowey.co.uk for full details.

IBP announce improvements to this year’s Communication Awards

Launching the “Call for Entries” for the 2015 IBP Communication and PR Awards Gerald Bowey, IBP chief executive, also announced the launch of the new IBP website, which has been rebuilt to accommodate a faster more user-friendly Awards entry process that will save time both in preparing material for entry and downloading information to the site, in a simpler pdf format.

Commenting Bowey said: “our sector is now largely driven by electronic delivery of information and it is important that IBP provides a compatible, easy to use entry process to make the experience as painless as possible!”

He went on “I am delighted that CAPSIG are partnering us again this year to ensure that the high standards of entries are maintained and promoted to as wide an audience as possible.”

Paul Wilkinson, chairman of the CIPR’s Construction and Property Special Interest Group (CAPSIG), said: “Judged by their peers and by industry journalists, previous winners of the IBP Communication and PR Awards all demonstrated sector-specific skills, knowledge, creativity and professionalism. This is a unique opportunity for built environment specialists to be rewarded for their expertise and flair.”

Here’s what some of last year’s winners say about the Awards:

The IBP Communication Awards offered me a unique chance to showcase some of my best work across my peer group. I learnt a great deal throughout my experience with IBP, and winning the Young Communicator of the Year has really bolstered my own profile and contacts in the built environment.

Ollie Pratt, FTI Consulting

Having our work recognized by IBP is important to us as an agency. The award judges are leading figures across the built environment so their endorsement of what we do reinforces our reputation in the sector and demonstrates we’re making an impact and adding value to our clients’ business.

Mike Conway, Camargue

IBP Annual National Journalism Awards 2013

In a year that has provided great campaigning journalism, in our business
magazines, including blacklisting of construction workers (winner of both
the News and Features categories) housing and welfare, personal rights and
fraud all grabbing the news headlines the judges commented, on more than
one occasion, that the quality of the investigative writing would have not
been out of place in a national newspaper.

However the housing sector provided some of the best stories and this year’s
winning weekly magazine, in a year which saw housing catapulted to the top
of the political agenda.

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